Preparing for Your Septic Tank Pumping

Depending on the size of a home and the number of occupants, a septic tank should be pumped every 1-3 years. Several factors contribute to requiring more frequent cleanings, such as having a garbage disposal (which we adamantly advise against), the age and design of the septic system, and the type and amount of solids being flushed into the system. … Read More

Home Repairs and Your Septic System: What Not to Flush Down the Drain

Home Improvements

Home improvement projects, fun as they may be, create a significant amount of “liquid waste” – everything from crud and grime to paint and joint compound. While some of these projects can be safely cleaned up and washed down the drain into public sewage treatment systems, most of them should never be flushed into your septic system.

Ohio Grants to Upgrade and Repair Septic Systems

Grants to Repair Septic Systems

In a report published in 2013, the Ohio Department of Health estimated that 31% of Ohio’s septic systems were experiencing failure to some degree. The state has since put into place regulations requiring most septic systems to have a service agreement with an approved septic provider. The goal of these regulations is to help combat the environmental risks associated with … Read More

Environmental Concerns of a Failing Septic System

Failing Septic System - Supeck Septic Services

Governor DeWine’s H2Ohio clean water initiative has entered its pilot phase, aimed at reducing agricultural fertilizer and phosphorus runoff [link to farming grants blog], restructuring and creating wetlands, and addressing failing septic systems. Noted as having the most significant impact on Ohio’s water quality, these three areas will be H2Ohio’s focus for the remainder of this year.

H2Ohio Offers Farming Grants to Help Combat Algae Blooms

For the past twenty years, Ohio has been dealing with a growing water contamination problem caused by algae blooms, leading to the creation of the Ohio Lake Erie Phosphorous Task Force in 2007 and culminating in the Toledo Water Crisis of 2014. Since then, the state has taken a serious look at what is causing the algae blooms plaguing our water supply and have found agricultural runoff to be the biggest contributing factor.